MilesFiles 23.0

Hundreds of Eastern Shore Families from Charlemagne to the Present

Notes


Matches 101 to 150 of 174,776

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101 "Joseph of Arglus" age 25 to 45, female same age, also young boy and girl Taylor, Joseph (I129205)
 
102 "Katie" Kilmon, wife of Samuel, died at age 80 years (Pen. Ent., 9 Nov 1889). She was referred to as Catherine Gray, in "Hacks Neck and Its People." Dennis, Catherine 'Caty|Kisiah' (I16950)
 
103 "Keel" 8/5/1772 Jacob Boston sold to Thomas Marshall 20 1/2A. 8/4/1786 Thomas Marshall with wife Esther sold 20 1/2A to Zadock Wheeler. (Ruth T. Dryden, Worcester Land Records, p. 342) Marshall, Thomas (I3297)
 
104 "Kendle" Fisher, age 18 years and son of "Kendle & Susan Fisher, died of typhoid. Fisher, Kendall (I25999)
 
105 "Levin Lawful," lessee of Caleb Niblet, brought ejectment against "Lawrence Luckless." Joanna Lewis and Zerrobabel Chandler became defendants and pleaded not guilty. The same was continued for trial. (NOTE: Since Zerrobabel is not shown with a guardian, he must now be age 21.) Chandler, Zorobabel (of Jno of Hathan) Sr. (I72168)
 
106 "Life Estate" of Mildred Allensworth - Summary and Partial Transcription
Posted 09 Aug 2012 by tobyville
King George County
Chancery Court Records Library of Virginia Case # 1860-003: Microfilm reel number 71, Image number 138 (beginning image)
Albert Suttle and Wife vs. Mildred Allensworth ETC.
1860-003 This court of Equity case has the second husband of Catharine Allensworth Bryan as well as Catharine, as Plaintiffs. Catharine is daughter of Henry and Mildred Allensworth.
Sept. 1859- Bill, Answer and Decree ordering Sale all done in the same month.
This case has to do with 82 acres belonging to Mildred Allensworth's "life estate" that she inherited from her mother Mary's "life estate". It does not appear that the 82 acres here was part of what Mildred might have received from the first case #1821-004 from her father's Will and mother's widow life estate because as you will soon see, the 82 acres was granted from Mary Rollins to daughter Mildred in a Deed of Trust in 1850. This is the year it appears that Henry died looking at Census records, 1850 U.S. Federal Census- Slave Schedules (in which the slave owner was listed as Mildred not Henry) and these Chancery records.
Partial transcription of Bill by Albert Suttle [mainly spelled as Suttle, but a few times spelled as Settles] and wife Catharine Allensworth Suttle:
"... Mary Rollins by deed dated the 6th day of May 1850/ a copy of which is herewith exhibited as part of/ [I did not receive a copy of this exhibit in my document packet from The Library of Virginia] conveyed to Daniel Coakley a tract or parcel of land in King George County containing 82 acres more or less, adjoining the lands of J.E. Jones, Richard Potts and others- in trust for the use of Mildred Allensworth for and during her life, and after her death to pass equally to her six children, to wit John, Butler [William Butler Allensworth], Susan, Jane, Margaret, and your complainant Catharine. [Note: It appears they called the youngest, Virginia, Jane.] Your complainants further represent that the said Mildred Allensworth is still living, but agrees to surrender at once, her life estate in said land to those entitled to it at her death, in order that it may be now divided or sold for division among them, according to their respective rights. Your complainants further state that the said Margaret Allensworth intermarried with one (blank) Jones, and has since died, leaving as her heirs at law, her three children, Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones.
Your complainants further represent to your honores (sic), that said lot of land is poor and of little value as an entire tract except to one who has lands adjoining. Partition can not be conveniently or judiciously be made of it, and the interests of those who are entitled to it will be promoted by a sale of the entire subject. To divide it, would be to give to each share or division 12 to 14 acres, with out buildings, wood or water; and one of the shares would be again subdivided into three parts. If sold as an entire lot, your complainants have reason to believe that it will bring full value..."
It goes on to state that Jane Allensworth, Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones are infants under the age of 21 and will need appointed a guardian to represent them in this matter. There is an Answer among my copies from Mildred Allensworth where she verifies she has agreed to surrender "life estate in the land mentioned within the Bill to those who would be entitled to it at her death." Again signed with an "X". Adult living children John, Butler (William Butler) and Susan gave their answer agreeing to a sale of the land and signed their names. Signatures are in different handwriting from each other and signed with middle initial, John H. Allensworth, William B. Allensworth and Susan F. Allensworth.
I did not receive the Sept. 1859 Decree of the Court ordering that the land be sold and division of the proceeds be done nor who was appointed as commissioner(s) to carry out the order and report back to the court for some reason. Perhaps it is missing, but more likely was overlooked to be included in my copy order. The commissioner report was not among my copies either.
I did receive the Final Decree of March Term 1860-
Robert Coakley was the single commissioner it seems. The 82 acre tract was sold to Richard Potts for $380 and proceeds to be divided evenly into six lots: Albert and Catharine Suttle $63.33 2/3. John, Butler and Susan Allensworth each receiving $63.33 2/3. Guardian of Jane [Virginia?] Allensworth on her behalf $63.33 1/3. Guardian of Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones on their behalf and jointly to receive $63.33 2/3.
Some observation notes from me: It appears that the Rollins family, Mildred's parents, were quite well off, perhaps even wealthy. The inheritance Mildred received from her parents most likely set up the Henry Allensworth family to also do well. I am sure Henry had accomplished much on his own and even perhaps from any inheritance he may of received from his own family. The boon from his in-laws must have been very welcome.
Compiled by Michelle Allensworth Pendleton aka tobyville 
Suttle, Albert B. Sr. (I3980)
 
107 "Life Estate" of Mildred Allensworth - Summary and Partial Transcription
Posted 09 Aug 2012 by tobyville
King George County
Chancery Court Records Library of Virginia Case # 1860-003: Microfilm reel number 71, Image number 138 (beginning image)
Albert Suttle and Wife vs. Mildred Allensworth ETC.
1860-003 This court of Equity case has the second husband of Catharine Allensworth Bryan as well as Catharine, as Plaintiffs. Catharine is daughter of Henry and Mildred Allensworth.
Sept. 1859- Bill, Answer and Decree ordering Sale all done in the same month.
This case has to do with 82 acres belonging to Mildred Allensworth's "life estate" that she inherited from her mother Mary's "life estate". It does not appear that the 82 acres here was part of what Mildred might have received from the first case #1821-004 from her father's Will and mother's widow life estate because as you will soon see, the 82 acres was granted from Mary Rollins to daughter Mildred in a Deed of Trust in 1850. This is the year it appears that Henry died looking at Census records, 1850 U.S. Federal Census- Slave Schedules (in which the slave owner was listed as Mildred not Henry) and these Chancery records.
Partial transcription of Bill by Albert Suttle [mainly spelled as Suttle, but a few times spelled as Settles] and wife Catharine Allensworth Suttle:
"... Mary Rollins by deed dated the 6th day of May 1850/ a copy of which is herewith exhibited as part of/ [I did not receive a copy of this exhibit in my document packet from The Library of Virginia] conveyed to Daniel Coakley a tract or parcel of land in King George County containing 82 acres more or less, adjoining the lands of J.E. Jones, Richard Potts and others- in trust for the use of Mildred Allensworth for and during her life, and after her death to pass equally to her six children, to wit John, Butler [William Butler Allensworth], Susan, Jane, Margaret, and your complainant Catharine. [Note: It appears they called the youngest, Virginia, Jane.] Your complainants further represent that the said Mildred Allensworth is still living, but agrees to surrender at once, her life estate in said land to those entitled to it at her death, in order that it may be now divided or sold for division among them, according to their respective rights. Your complainants further state that the said Margaret Allensworth intermarried with one (blank) Jones, and has since died, leaving as her heirs at law, her three children, Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones.
Your complainants further represent to your honores (sic), that said lot of land is poor and of little value as an entire tract except to one who has lands adjoining. Partition can not be conveniently or judiciously be made of it, and the interests of those who are entitled to it will be promoted by a sale of the entire subject. To divide it, would be to give to each share or division 12 to 14 acres, with out buildings, wood or water; and one of the shares would be again subdivided into three parts. If sold as an entire lot, your complainants have reason to believe that it will bring full value..."
It goes on to state that Jane Allensworth, Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones are infants under the age of 21 and will need appointed a guardian to represent them in this matter. There is an Answer among my copies from Mildred Allensworth where she verifies she has agreed to surrender "life estate in the land mentioned within the Bill to those who would be entitled to it at her death." Again signed with an "X". Adult living children John, Butler (William Butler) and Susan gave their answer agreeing to a sale of the land and signed their names. Signatures are in different handwriting from each other and signed with middle initial, John H. Allensworth, William B. Allensworth and Susan F. Allensworth.
I did not receive the Sept. 1859 Decree of the Court ordering that the land be sold and division of the proceeds be done nor who was appointed as commissioner(s) to carry out the order and report back to the court for some reason. Perhaps it is missing, but more likely was overlooked to be included in my copy order. The commissioner report was not among my copies either.
I did receive the Final Decree of March Term 1860-
Robert Coakley was the single commissioner it seems. The 82 acre tract was sold to Richard Potts for $380 and proceeds to be divided evenly into six lots: Albert and Catharine Suttle $63.33 2/3. John, Butler and Susan Allensworth each receiving $63.33 2/3. Guardian of Jane [Virginia?] Allensworth on her behalf $63.33 1/3. Guardian of Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones on their behalf and jointly to receive $63.33 2/3.
Some observation notes from me: It appears that the Rollins family, Mildred's parents, were quite well off, perhaps even wealthy. The inheritance Mildred received from her parents most likely set up the Henry Allensworth family to also do well. I am sure Henry had accomplished much on his own and even perhaps from any inheritance he may of received from his own family. The boon from his in-laws must have been very welcome.
Compiled by Michelle Allensworth Pendleton aka tobyville 
Allensworth, Catherine (I34842)
 
108 "Life Estate" of Mildred Allensworth - Summary and Partial Transcription
Posted 09 Aug 2012 by tobyville
King George County
Chancery Court Records Library of Virginia Case # 1860-003: Microfilm reel number 71, Image number 138 (beginning image)
Albert Suttle and Wife vs. Mildred Allensworth ETC.
1860-003 This court of Equity case has the second husband of Catharine Allensworth Bryan as well as Catharine, as Plaintiffs. Catharine is daughter of Henry and Mildred Allensworth.
Sept. 1859- Bill, Answer and Decree ordering Sale all done in the same month.
This case has to do with 82 acres belonging to Mildred Allensworth's "life estate" that she inherited from her mother Mary's "life estate". It does not appear that the 82 acres here was part of what Mildred might have received from the first case #1821-004 from her father's Will and mother's widow life estate because as you will soon see, the 82 acres was granted from Mary Rollins to daughter Mildred in a Deed of Trust in 1850. This is the year it appears that Henry died looking at Census records, 1850 U.S. Federal Census- Slave Schedules (in which the slave owner was listed as Mildred not Henry) and these Chancery records.
Partial transcription of Bill by Albert Suttle [mainly spelled as Suttle, but a few times spelled as Settles] and wife Catharine Allensworth Suttle:
"... Mary Rollins by deed dated the 6th day of May 1850/ a copy of which is herewith exhibited as part of/ [I did not receive a copy of this exhibit in my document packet from The Library of Virginia] conveyed to Daniel Coakley a tract or parcel of land in King George County containing 82 acres more or less, adjoining the lands of J.E. Jones, Richard Potts and others- in trust for the use of Mildred Allensworth for and during her life, and after her death to pass equally to her six children, to wit John, Butler [William Butler Allensworth], Susan, Jane, Margaret, and your complainant Catharine. [Note: It appears they called the youngest, Virginia, Jane.] Your complainants further represent that the said Mildred Allensworth is still living, but agrees to surrender at once, her life estate in said land to those entitled to it at her death, in order that it may be now divided or sold for division among them, according to their respective rights. Your complainants further state that the said Margaret Allensworth intermarried with one (blank) Jones, and has since died, leaving as her heirs at law, her three children, Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones.
Your complainants further represent to your honores (sic), that said lot of land is poor and of little value as an entire tract except to one who has lands adjoining. Partition can not be conveniently or judiciously be made of it, and the interests of those who are entitled to it will be promoted by a sale of the entire subject. To divide it, would be to give to each share or division 12 to 14 acres, with out buildings, wood or water; and one of the shares would be again subdivided into three parts. If sold as an entire lot, your complainants have reason to believe that it will bring full value..."
It goes on to state that Jane Allensworth, Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones are infants under the age of 21 and will need appointed a guardian to represent them in this matter. There is an Answer among my copies from Mildred Allensworth where she verifies she has agreed to surrender "life estate in the land mentioned within the Bill to those who would be entitled to it at her death." Again signed with an "X". Adult living children John, Butler (William Butler) and Susan gave their answer agreeing to a sale of the land and signed their names. Signatures are in different handwriting from each other and signed with middle initial, John H. Allensworth, William B. Allensworth and Susan F. Allensworth.
I did not receive the Sept. 1859 Decree of the Court ordering that the land be sold and division of the proceeds be done nor who was appointed as commissioner(s) to carry out the order and report back to the court for some reason. Perhaps it is missing, but more likely was overlooked to be included in my copy order. The commissioner report was not among my copies either.
I did receive the Final Decree of March Term 1860-
Robert Coakley was the single commissioner it seems. The 82 acre tract was sold to Richard Potts for $380 and proceeds to be divided evenly into six lots: Albert and Catharine Suttle $63.33 2/3. John, Butler and Susan Allensworth each receiving $63.33 2/3. Guardian of Jane [Virginia?] Allensworth on her behalf $63.33 1/3. Guardian of Charles, Mary Ann and William Jones on their behalf and jointly to receive $63.33 2/3.
Some observation notes from me: It appears that the Rollins family, Mildred's parents, were quite well off, perhaps even wealthy. The inheritance Mildred received from her parents most likely set up the Henry Allensworth family to also do well. I am sure Henry had accomplished much on his own and even perhaps from any inheritance he may of received from his own family. The boon from his in-laws must have been very welcome.
Compiled by Michelle Allensworth Pendleton aka tobyville 
Rollins, Mildred (I34843)
 
109 "Loudy" Linton was shot and instantly killed about 8 o'clock Sunday evening by Crawley Justis, both of Saxis, VA. Mr. Justis had recently returned from the asylum very much improved, but becoming demented again and unmanageable, the Justice of the Peace summoned Mr. Linton to assist in arresting him. On approaching his home they were fired upon from an upper window with result as stated. The officer succeeded in making the arrest Monday morning and he was taken to the asylum at Williamsburg, VA. Mr. Linton was a highly respected citizen and the unfortunate affair has cast a gloom over the community. He is survived by his widow and four children, to whom sincere sympathy is extended (Acc News, 27 Aug 1915). Lodi Linton's unmarked grave was identified by Rhoney May Linton in Jun 1981. Linton, Loda Franklin 'Lodi' (I1988)
 
110 "Marshall's Addition" patented in 1748. Marshall, Isaac Sr. (I56181)
 
111 "Mears & wife &c.
vs - Suit for sale & division
Chandler.
That a certain Nancy Bull late of this county departed this life intestate on the ____ day of ____ 1821 under age and without issue; at the death of the said Nancy Bull she was seized in fee simple of a parcel of land on Folly Creek containing 18 acres, and that the said land descended as follows: to your oratrix, Bridget Mears, wife of William Mears, 1/4; to your orators William & James Bull 1/4 and to Bagwell Chandler & Mary Chandler, infant children of Mary Chandler, formerly Mary Bull, who departed this life on the ____ day of ____ 1818, and who was sister of said Nancy Bull, the other 1/4. 30 Mar. 1821 - p. 184" 
Bull, Bridget (I43407)
 
112 "Mears & wife &c.
vs - Suit for sale & division
Chandler.
That a certain Nancy Bull late of this county departed this life intestate on the ____ day of ____ 1821 under age and without issue; at the death of the said Nancy Bull she was seized in fee simple of a parcel of land on Folly Creek containing 18 acres, and that the said land descended as follows: to your oratrix, Bridget Mears, wife of William Mears, 1/4; to your orators William & James Bull 1/4 and to Bagwell Chandler & Mary Chandler, infant children of Mary Chandler, formerly Mary Bull, who departed this life on the ____ day of ____ 1818, and who was sister of said Nancy Bull, the other 1/4. 30 Mar. 1821 - p. 184" 
Bull, William (I76188)
 
113 "Mears & wife &c.
vs - Suit for sale & division
Chandler.
That a certain Nancy Bull late of this county departed this life intestate on the ____ day of ____ 1821 under age and without issue; at the death of the said Nancy Bull she was seized in fee simple of a parcel of land on Folly Creek containing 18 acres, and that the said land descended as follows: to your oratrix, Bridget Mears, wife of William Mears, 1/4; to your orators William & James Bull 1/4 and to Bagwell Chandler & Mary Chandler, infant children of Mary Chandler, formerly Mary Bull, who departed this life on the ____ day of ____ 1818, and who was sister of said Nancy Bull, the other 1/4. 30 Mar. 1821 - p. 184" 
Bull, James (of Bagwell) (I44935)
 
114 "Mears & wife &c.
vs - Suit for sale & division
Chandler.
That a certain Nancy Bull late of this county departed this life intestate on the ____ day of ____ 1821 under age and without issue; at the death of the said Nancy Bull she was seized in fee simple of a parcel of land on Folly Creek containing 18 acres, and that the said land descended as follows: to your oratrix, Bridget Mears, wife of William Mears, 1/4; to your orators William & James Bull 1/4 and to Bagwell Chandler & Mary Chandler, infant children of Mary Chandler, formerly Mary Bull, who departed this life on the ____ day of ____ 1818, and who was sister of said Nancy Bull, the other 1/4. 30 Mar. 1821 - p. 184" 
Bull, Nancy (I128001)
 
115 "Merrill Hall" 7/13/1786 John (Drummond) Marshall with wife Ann sold part to Thomas Marshall. 8/5/1786 Isaac Boston with wife Elizabeth & Thomas Layfield sold to Thomas Marshall 103A. 12/26/1786 Thomas Marshall with wife Esther sold to James Harper 100A of "Addition" & "Merrill Hall." 12/26/1786 Thomas Marshall with wife Esther Marshall sold to John Drummond Marshall lands not already sold. (Ruth T. Dryden, Worcester Land Records, p. 394) Marshall, Thomas (I3297)
 
116 "Molly Kilman Gulfd" is listed as a head of an 1800 household in Acc Parish, aged over 45, with one female 26-45, one female 10-16, and one male 16-26. The "Gulfd" was obviously Guilford. Also living close by on "Jobs Isld" were Elizabeth "Kilman" (probably her sister-in-law) and Mathew "Kilman" (probably her brother-in-law). "Jobs Isld" was obviously Jobes Island which was located on the southern shoreline entrance to Guilford Creek. The only other "Kilmans" listed in Acc Co in 1800 were Edward (26-45) and Ezekiel (16-26), both in Acc Parish. They were probably Molly's sons. (--?--), Molly (I16911)
 
117 "Mrs. Mary Ruffin Collett, one of the best known and most universally beloved women of the town, died early Tuesday morning at her home here. She passed away quietly and peacefully as if going to sleep, her frail little body apparently giving out under the strain of years. She had reached the advanced age of 80 years, her entire life spent in Morganton, where she married and brought up her own family."
"Mrs. Collett was a daughter of the late Governor Todd R. Caldwell, the Caldwell family intimately connected with the history of Morganton and Burke county since colonial days. Her only surviving sister is Mrs. Walter Brem of Charlotte."
"She married Dr. Waighstill Collett, who died a number of years ago. After his death she bravely took up the task of rearing a large family of children and how well she accomplished her life work has been exemplified in their lives of usefulness and service."
"The surviving children are: Mr. S. R. Collett, of Morganton; Mrs. John N. Wilson, of Greensboro; Mrs. A. M. Kistler, of Morganton; Mrs. J. J. Farnam, of New York; Mrs. J. T. Walton, of Hickory; Miss Minerva Collett and Mr. Moran Collett, of Morganton."
"The funeral services, attended by a large crowd of sorrowing relatives and friends, were held at Grace Episcopal church, of which she was a devoted member. The body was tenderly laid to rest in the church yard by the side of her husband. Rev. N. C. Duncan, rector of the church, had charge of the services. He was assisted by Rev. S. B. Stroup, of Hickory. The grave was heaped high with masses of beautiful flowers, fitting tributes to the life that had passed out and symbolic of her virtues and goodness."
"Out of town relatives here for the funeral were Mr. John N. Wilson, of Greensboro; Mr. Robin Brem and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mayer, of Charlotte, and Miss Kittie Laxton, of Asheville. Mrs. Charles Kistler who had been in Greensboro, came home for the funeral."
Editorial: A Beautiful LIfe.
"To some minds in thinking of people it comes rather natural to compare them with things in the material realm. In the last years of her life Mrs. Collett reminded one of a rare peice of delicate china, or a fine vase of exquisite beauty or possibly what more nearly describes the impression was that indescribable beauty of a pure white, full-blown rose from an old fashioned garden, one to be tended carefully lest the slightest breeze waft the petals away. In spite of the tender care, the loving solicitude the time had come for the petals to fall and there is left the memory of the purity and beauty of her life."
" However in her case there is more than a memory -- there is left on the community the impress of a life of loving kindness, charity and goodness. Her years were full of noble deeds, her life a benediction to the town where she lived and loved, experienced sadness and joy and gave to her children and freinds the heritage of her wonderful devotion, loyalty and loving service.". 
Caldwell, Mary Ruffin (I118747)
 
118 "Murry" Martin, age 19, and Rachel Marshall, age 17, both of Saxis, VA, were issued a marriage license in Somerset Co, MD, on 23 apr 1909, but it was not used. Martin, James Murray 'Mear' (I1472)
 
119 "my mulatto woman" Abigail given to William Kendall's son Custis Kendall. Her designation as mulatto in a period in which Negro, Indian, mulatto were used very specifically indicates that she was not the daughter of Jenny Jacob's husband Nick. Jacob, Abigail (I127250)
 
120 "Naomi's account of Charles' estate mentions a "legacy given my Daughter Jemima wch. my husband recd." and about £6 "Cash to be paid to my Dau. besides her legacy Given her by her Grandmother in Lieu of that Perishable Estate." This is a reference to the will of Elizabeth (Parker) Bradford, who gave all her household goods "to be Equally Divided Between my Daughter Jemima and my Two grand Children Jemima and Violetta."144 Charles and Naomi's other children - Noah, Thomas, and Charles - each also received around £6 cash in lieu of their father's perishable estate. Noah was the first child listed and in addition to cash he received "negroes Agnes and Leah", which indicates he was heir-at-law. Also paid out of Charles' estate were Jacob4 Bradford (Wm3), Zorobabel Rodgers, James Scott, William Stockly, Isaac Smith, and John Bradford (probably John3). Jacob4 Bradford was additionally paid "by being Security for Edmund Bradford", meaning Edmund4 Bradford (Thos3) As widow, Naomi received "my Thirds of negroes a Woman called Chany" as well as a third of the cash remaining after the debts were paid. Bradford, Naomi (45) (of Nath & Eliz) (I26680)
 
121 "Neil" Drewer was in the 1900 Saxis household (HH) #434 and the 1910 Saxis HH#24 with his parents, John R. and Kate Drewer. For some unknown reason, he and his wife and family were not listed in the 1920 census. Neil was born in his parent's home at Saxis, where he lived the later part of his life. He worked on the water with his father to help support the family when the weather permitted and went to school in the winter months when the weather was bad. He stopped school after the third grade. He loved to read and study the Bible and history and was quite good at math and reading maps and charts. As a young man he built an ice boat which many young people enjoyed when the Pocomoke Sound was frozen across to the Maryland shoreline. It was reported that he once swam in a cow pond naked. As a little fellow he and his sister, Mae, who was two years older than him, were sent out to the garden to bury a dead baby chicken. As Mae was digging the hole with a wide grubbing hoe, she accidentally cut him across the top of his head. He carried that scar the rest of his life. He also had a scar across the back of his right hand which he got from the propeller on a bateau crabbing boat when a rope got caught around it when he was crabbing.

He and his bride, Evva Kilmon, who was teaching at the Saxis elementary school at the time, eloped to Crisfield, MD, in a boat during a December snowstorm. After his marriage he and his wife lived with his parents until their home was built. During World War I he worked in the shipyards in Newport News, VA, but his wife and children lived at home in Saxis, VA. After World War I he returned to Saxis and worked was a waterman and mariner. In 1935, after the death of his father, he bought his parent's home and moved his wife and three youngest children from the home he built into his father's home. His oldest son, Earl, and his new bride, Madge, bought the house Neil built and their first child was born there. He sailed freight boats all over the Chesapeake Bay area.

During World War II he and his two sons enlisted in the US Coast Guard Auxiliary which temporarily admitted his 65 foot boat, the J.C. DREWER, into service as a Coast Guard buoy tender. (Source: his daughter Nellie Catherine Drewer). Capt. Neil Drewer of the US Coast Guard spent a few days recently with his family (Pen. Ent., 12 Mar 1943). On 16 Dec 1910 - Capt. "Neil" Drewer, son of Capt. John R. Drewer, and Miss Eva Killmon eloped to Crisfield on Wednesday evening, December 16th, and were united in he holy bonds of wedlock. - Saxis letter in Onancock News. (Virginia Citizen of Irvinton, VA, 14 Jan 1910). On 4 Mar 1929 when he was 39 years old, 5 years before his father, John R. Drewer (1865-1934) died, and only 7 months before the Stock Market crashed and the Great Depression began, he and his younger brother Howard signed a letter agreement with the L.P. Price Co., Inc., Fishing Bay Railway, of Ruark, VA to build a gas powered buy boat of the dead rise type 64 ft 10 in long, 18 ½ ft wide and 6 ft deep to be built of fir pine sides, Georgia pine deck, Virginia spruce deck beams, spruce bottom, stem, stem line, shaftlog, stern post, hatch combings, log, guard and monkey rail are to be of white oak. The bottom ceiled with 2 inch Virginia pine, all bulk heads put in, boat caulked and painted with two coasts of paint outside and a coat of pine oil inside hull, pilot house to be completed, engine bedding put in. The boat was to have one mast, one boom & one gaft, two chain plates with dead eyes, mast to be put in and rigging set up. Weather permitting the boat was to be delivered at the place of the builder by 15 June 1929 for the sum of $3,400. They agreed to pay $500 upfront and the order balance was to be paid as needed. In August 1929 the Recession begins, two months before the stock market crash. During this two month period, production will decline at an annual rate of 20%, wholesale prices at 7.5%, and personal income at 5%. The Stock Market Crash begins 24 October 1929. His grandson J.C. “Johnny” Drewer III has the ledger book he kept aboard the J.C. DREWER from Feb 1932 to May 1942. The very first page of the ledger shows monthly interest payments to the Bank of Crisfield and smaller interest payments to the Marine Bank. In 1932 he was evidently hauling fertilizer and ports of call included Salisbury, St. Michaels, Snow Hill and one entry shows 1,070 bushels of oysters from the Seaside to Crisfield. In 1932 he was paying 10 cents a bushel for oysters taken off the Corbin ground (or being paid 10 cents per bushel for freight only). On 7 May 1932 he paid Earl (his son) and Clifton (Marshall) 50 cents each for a days work. In August he was hauling fertilizer from Norfolk to Washington, NC. In June 1934 they made their first listed trip to Davis Wharf, hauling 741 barrels of potatoes from there to Crisfield, MD. Less than a year later his son Earl married Madge Davis of Davis Wharf in Apr 1935. In Oct 1940 he was hauling oysters from James River to Chincoteague. On the last page of the ledger, recorded on 21 Feb 1942, was an interest & bond payment of $49 and in April he spent $3.25 looking for engine parts. On 3 June 1942 Mr. J.C. Drewer, of Saxis, VA, received a letter from the United States Maritime Commission, Norfolk, VA, informing him that instructions have been received from the War Shipping Administrator to requisition your vessel J.C. DREWER official number 228850 under Section 902 of the Merchant Marine Act 1936 as amended. Delivery is to be made as soon as possible to the District Coast Officer, Fifth Naval District, and to simplify the delivery procedure you are requested to dispatch the boat to the Coast Guard Station, Berkley, Virginia. This station is located across the river from the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia. Before the vessel leaves its present location to proceed to Berkley you are requested to telephone or telegraph the District Manager, U.S. Maritime Commission, Norfolk, Virginia, giving the approximate time of arrival at Berkley. The telephone is Norfolk 22205. A survey and inventory will be made at Berkley by representatives of the War Shipping Administrator and Coast Guard and yourself or your representative. The vessel’s papers (license) are to be delivered to the representative of the War Shipping Administrator. Signed G.F. Blair, District Manager. On 8 June 1942 a document entitled “Offer of a Vessel of the Auxiliary” was signed by John C. Drewer, Saxis, VA and Howard S. Drewer, Crisfield, MD, members of the US Coast Guard Auxiliary, who acknowledged that this was merely a license for the use of the vessel which may be relinquished at any time by the Coast Guard and estimating the value of the vessel, equipment & supplies on board to be $9,500. On 11 June 1942 this document was signed by the Coast Guard accepting the use of the J.C. DREWER 228850 for the duration of the war. The 62 foot workboat J.C. DREWER was assigned the C.G.R. No. 2001 and was to be stationed Off-Shore on the mission of Rescue & Observation patrol. On that same date John Cornelius Drewer (507-707) C.B.M. (T) USCGR received orders to active duty in the Temporary Coast Guard Reserve for the duration of the war and was to report to the District Coast Guard Officer, Fifth Naval District (Norfolk, VA) for assignment. On 13 Dec 1942 John C. Drewer Sr., a Chief Boatswain Mate (CMB), was disenrolled as a temporary CMB of the US Coast Guard Reserve so that he could enlist in the Regular Reserve. Order issued by the 5(SUP:)th(:SUP) Naval District (Norfolk, VA) & signed by W.F. Cass, Lt. Cmdr, USGC Reserve & Auxiliary Division. On 9 Aug 1944 he received his official Honorable Discharge from the United States Coast Guard as a Chief Boatswain’s Mate from the CGR-2001, Norfolk, Virginia. A document attached to his Discharge shows that he enlisted as a CBM on 14 Dec 1942 at Norfolk, VA for 3 years and that he held the rank of DBM (R) until 9 Aug 1944. He was 5 ft 9 in tall and weighted 186 lbs, with gray eyes, brown hair, a ruddy complexion, and had a tattoo on his right forearm “JOHN CONELIOUS DREWER” and “SAXIS, VIRGINIA.” His monthly rate of pay when discharged was $138 and was paid for 2 years, 1 month, 28 days. On 20 Dec 1944 he received a letter from R.R. Waesche, Vice Admiral, USGC, Commandant, stating that his vessel J.C. DREWER, which was placed a the disposal of the Coast Guard on 11 June 1942 has now been returned to your. It stated that the Coast Guard appreciated his patriotically proffer of his vessel to meet the extraordinary emergency and duty responsibilities of the Coast Guard in providing for anti-submarine, coastal, harbor and security patrols on an unprecedented scale. On 5 Jan 1949 he received a letter from the Secretary of the Navy, Washington, stating that soon after the outbreak of hospitalities, and a time when the menace to national defense and vital interests was most critical, the vessel J.C. DREWER, owned jointly by him and Mr. Howard S. Drewer, was made available to the Coast Guard and became a contributing factor toward the furtherance of the war effort. The J.C. DREWER has now been returned to you, and it will no doubt be a matter of great pride and interest to you to know that the J.C. DREWER gave valuable and excellent service in the important duties assigned to her. In recognition of the service rendered by the J.C. DREWER, you are authorized to place in the most appropriate display location five chevrons, one for each six months’ active service with the Coast Guard. The Navy Department takes this opportunity to express its sincere appreciation and grateful thanks for your patriotic and generous contribution in the hour of the country’s most urgent need. I am addressing a similar letter to Mr. Howard S. Drewer. Signed John R. Sullivan. Attached to the letter was a drawing showing the 5 chevrons and how to display them on the vessel. He died suddenly of a heart attack in 1960. Mr. John C. Drewer Sr., a retired waterman and veteran of World War II, died at his home at Saxis on 21 Apr 1960, aged 70 years. Survivors were listed (Pen. Ent., 28 Apr 1960). The following information was provided by Evelyn (Lewis) Powell, one of Neil's nieces. "Uncle Neil was born a couple of years after my mother. He was very active and although it was said the Drewers couldn't sing he evidently did. Mother said he was in some sort of entertainment where he sang a song about "The Owl and the Pussy Cat set out to sea in a beautiful Pea Green Boat." That is all I remember of the song. When my family went to live at Grandpa's after my father, Arnold Lewis, died in 1920, we found in the attic a big bass horn which we tried to blow, but never had enough wind to get a sound. Mother said it was Uncle Neil's and he had belonged to a "town band" when he was young. After my father died, Uncle Neil and Aunt Evva would come to visit with their children, Earl, Kathryn, and Myrtle. J.C., was born later. He would get us children to put our chairs in a circle and play games with us. One game I remember was pass the thimble, which had a little water in it and when one lost the game they got the thimble of water. We will always remember Uncle Neil as very religious. When he was a young boy, a man from Temperanceville, Bill Nock, who had his own Bank, came over for a visit and, as always, he was asked to stay for dinner. He was a surly sort and the children didn't like him. For once Grandma didn't expect company and there was no dessert. Grandpa had been to Baltimore and had brought home a whole bunch of bananas and he suggested they be dessert. Mr. Nock said he didn't know if he would like them, he had never tasted them. Uncle Neil, in not a real soft voice, said, "the old son of a bitch hadn't tasted them because he was too stingy to buy them." The children thought it was funny, but it didn't go over real big with Grandma and Grandpa. The Christmas after my father died Uncle Neil and Aunt Evva gave me a child's china tea set, which I treasured, though some of it was glued together. I was pleased to pass it on to their great-granddaughter, Rebecca Lynn Miles. My grand-children are all boys and I didn't think they would appreciate a tea set. I always felt a close relationship with Uncle Neil and Aunt Evva. Earl and I were the same age and he and J.C. have always been close to us. There is no doubt that the whole Drewer family was active in the church. Uncle Neil used his money many times to help pay for electricity and fuel when his family probably needed things. He worked hard and gave to poor people and was loved by everyone." 

Drewer, John Cornelius 'Neil' Sr. (I6)
 
122 "On the petition of Henry Hall and others to open a public road ordered that Michael Robins, Thomas Fletcher, Jacob Northam and James Northam or any 3 of them being first duly sworn to view the ground over which the said road is to be conducted and report to the court the convinces and inconvinces which will result therefrom as well as to the public as to individuals and make report thereof to the court." This petition for a road was continued on page 330 of the same order book. (Acc Orders 1824-27, p. 157, date 1 Jun 1825) Hall, Henry Jr. (I3990)
 
123 "One James White, aged 16" lived in the North West Hundred, and his mother, Mary White, aged 45, was the head of the household in 1776 [Ref: K-1:225]. (--?--), Mary (I124226)
 
124 "One of my earliest recollections of personalities at Rockford was of Thomas Knox who was carpenter and general handy man about the place. He was also something of an expert gardener and used to do some gardening for my mother. I remember distinctly a pair of sleds which he built for my brother and myself, - William's being rather larger than mine, - and that he painted them blue; and when he finished mine he brought it up to the house, carrying it on his hand over his shoulder, with the blue paint still wet, and hunted a place in the wood shed to put it to dry. I remember his rebuilding of the brick over (oven?) the woodshed at the East end of the old house. The baking in this was done by first building a hot fire in the oven with dry wood, and when the fire had burned out, the coke and ashes were dragged out and the bread pans put in. After the bread was baked the oven was filled with wood to dry and make a hot fire for the next baking day. He had a very sonorous far-reaching voice, and one day when I was standing by him as he was working at one of the flower beds, there was an alarm of fire called from the mill. The old man lifted up his voice and shouted "Fire! REGULAR!" until I think everybody on the place heard him and there was a rush to the mill, but the fire was put out in a few moments without any special damage. He was the grandfather of Joseph Nivin Knox now at Rockford, our chief bill-clerk. I learned from his grandson that Thomas Knox was born December 29, 1795, in Accomac County, Virginia. I do not know when he came to Delaware, but, as I have said above, he was amongst my earliest recollections of persons at Rockford. After leaving here he went to work for the Wilsons at duPonts making powder kegs, and later worked directly for the duPonts. The last time I remember seeing him was the afternoon of May 31st, 1854, on 14th Street in Wilmington where he was helping to clear up things after the explosion of the powder wagons. While looking around I made a very ghastly find,- the left foot of one of the teamsters torn off at the ankle, and I hunted up Tom Knox and got him to put it with the other relics of the explosion. He died on March 11th, 1857, in the little house on the South side of Kennett turnpike opposite the end of the Rockford Lane." Nock, Thomas (Knox) (I86830)
 
125 "Orphan of Robert" not of age, bound to Jacob White to learn trade of shoemaker Taylor, Charles (I128886)
 
126 "Orphan of Robert", bound to William Savage to learn trade of shoemaker Taylor, Charles (I128886)
 
127 "Pleas at the Courthouse. On 20 Jun 1793 came Littleton Sterling by Thomas Evans his attorney. Bill against Samuel Marshall & Solomon Marshall in custody & of a plea of Tresspass Assault & Battery - in 1792 in Accomack Parish with force & armes to wit with Staves and guns made an assault upon the said Littleton Sterling & then & there beat wounded & evilly treated, so that his life was greatly dispaired of & other enormities to him then & there against the peace of the Commonwealth, & to the damage of the said Littleton Sterling of £100 & therefore he bringeth suit & c - - -. A jury trial - Defts are guilty - fined Forty Shillings. On p. 553 of the same record book, exactly same as above, only suit brought by Molly, wife of Littleton Sterling. The assumption here is that the two suits were actually against Samuel & Sampson Marshall, rather than Samuel & Solomon, assuming that the court recorder made an error in the name of Solomon. This is based on there being no record of a Solomon Marshall among the Bayside Marshalls during this period, there being no Samuel Marshall among the Seaside Marshalls of this period & the fact that Samuel & Sampson Marshall were brothers on the Bayside during this period. (Acc Dist Court Complete Record, 1791-1794, p. 551) Sterling, Littleton (I39777)
 
128 "Plotting a path from Parksley to prairie" By Candy Taylor
Editor's note:
In 1984 a lady living in New Mexico placed an ad in the Eastern Shore News requesting information about her ancestors. T. Drummond Mason of Parksley responded to that ad. In return he received information about a Parksley native who played a key role in the settling of the west- but never forgot his roots. Mr. Mason has made that information available for publication in the following account of the life of one remarkable man.
The obituary appeared in the Nov. 7, 1938 edition of the Kiowa News - Review - Record in Kiowa, Kan. "Major Socrates Justis, son of Samuel and Mary Justis, was born on Dec. 25, 1848. near Parksley, Accomac (sic) County, Va.," it read. "He departed this life at his home in Kiowa, Kan., on Nov. 2, 1938, at the age of 89 years, ten months, and seven days."
No simple newspaper obituary could have contained what those 89-plus years had represented - or the mark M.S. Justis had left on one area along the old Chisholm Trail.
Apparently, M.S. had spent his early years living quite happily in the Parksley area, but at the age of 24 got a hankering to wander out west. It was 1872, and the west was still wild. Fortunately, M.S. had at some point recounted his fabulous experiences to a reporter in Kansas. Thus they have been preserved for posterity.
He began his account with details of how he, along with Dr. A.F.D. Ewell and Oliver Ewell, made their way from Parksley to the mighty Mississippi in just four days. After crossing the river on a ferry, the trio eventually, by way of a team and wagon, arrived in Summer County, Kan., where they staked a claim on the Chikaskia River. Their claim was
on the Chisholm Trail.
The three young men found pioneer life hard and by the time the winter of 1872 rolled around, they were nearly destitute. Their cash had all been spent on stocking their claim with cattle.
Writing to relatives back home in Parksley, the men requested $350 to get them through the winter. There was an additional problem, however, when wrote M.S., "the postmaster...stole our draft, and we had a lean winter - prairie chickens, cornbread, and milk."
They persevered, however, and following the conviction of the postmaster and the return of their money, more cattle were purchased.
M.S. next related how in 1874 the grasshopper plague hit the plains. "One day we went out with corn knives to cut the corn," he wrote. "After working all morning, we had to ride two miles for dinner - and when we got back we could hardly find the sod corn. The grasshoppers had arrived during our absence, and they literally ate everything. - We had to put our clothes in the dugout to keep the grasshoppers from eating them. They were so thick they even stopped the Santa Fe train running to Dodge City."
More cattle dealing in the southwest followed. Again, adversity took its toll. Less than half of a herd of 1,050 survived one strenuous drive. In 1876, MS. and the two Ewells sold their remaining livestock and returned to Parksley.
It is not clear from the surviving notes exactly when M.S. Justis returned to the prairie life; however, it is clear that in 1878 he and Olive were reunited near Dodge City. Dr. A.F.D. Ewell apparently remained in Parksley, the town in which his gravesite can be seen today.
Indian uprisings were the norm at the time Ewell and Justis got back in the cattle business.
M.S. wrote, "While riding up the Chisholm Trail one day I saw a group of men coming. When I got closer to them I found they were Indians. I was so scared I had to hold my hat on with my hand."
Despite this additional peril, the partners were successful enough that in 1884 they became key investors in the Kiowa Town Company.
The stockholders purchased 5,000 acres of Kansas territory at $8 an acre. The town of Kiowa was born.
Being a businessman, M.S. knew the town needed a financial institution to draw in other enterprises. Soon the Bank of Kiowa was a reality - but not until after the safe, being brought in from great distance by wagon, had spent several days stuck in the Medicine River.
Not wanting to risk such difficulty with the delivery of the cash to stock the safe, M.S. rode from Harper to the fledging town with $8,000 operational money in his pants pocket.
The next major event in M.S. Justis' new town was one which, strangely enough, was occurring simultaneously in his native town. The first trims to pull into Kiowa, and Parksley, likely received the same jubilar receptions back in 1885.
Meanwhile the cattle business of Ewell and Justis was flourishing at last. Twenty-five thousand head of cattle grazed on prairie land lease from the Cherokees. There were still some rough times ahead o particularly after the "open range" was opened for settlement.
But until his death in 1938, M.S. Justis, retained his pioneer spirit ... an his ties to his native Eastern Shore. He boasted of having returned to Parksley 11 times during the years he was helping to settle a once wild land. But it was his own town of Kiowa he loved best ... and which love him best.
That obituary did contain a bit more than the basic facts about the man. It contained a tribute ... "His life was that of the rugged and progressive pioneer, always willing and eager to render his part to the best interest his community and surroundings." (Source Eastern Shore News, April 1984, by Candy Taylor) 
Justice, Major Socrates (I20306)
 
129 "Plotting a path from Parksley to prairie" By Candy Taylor
Editor's note:
In 1984 a lady living in New Mexico placed an ad in the Eastern Shore News requesting information about her ancestors. T. Drummond Mason of Parksley responded to that ad. In return he received information about a Parksley native who played a key role in the settling of the west- but never forgot his roots. Mr. Mason has made that information available for publication in the following account of the life of one remarkable man.
The obituary appeared in the Nov. 7, 1938 edition of the Kiowa News - Review - Record in Kiowa, Kan. "Major Socrates Justis, son of Samuel and Mary Justis, was born on Dec. 25, 1848. near Parksley, Accomac (sic) County, Va.," it read. "He departed this life at his home in Kiowa, Kan., on Nov. 2, 1938, at the age of 89 years, ten months, and seven days."
No simple newspaper obituary could have contained what those 89-plus years had represented - or the mark M.S. Justis had left on one area along the old Chisholm Trail.
Apparently, M.S. had spent his early years living quite happily in the Parksley area, but at the age of 24 got a hankering to wander out west. It was 1872, and the west was still wild. Fortunately, M.S. had at some point recounted his fabulous experiences to a reporter in Kansas. Thus they have been preserved for posterity.
He began his account with details of how he, along with Dr. A.F.D. Ewell and Oliver Ewell, made their way from Parksley to the mighty Mississippi in just four days. After crossing the river on a ferry, the trio eventually, by way of a team and wagon, arrived in Summer County, Kan., where they staked a claim on the Chikaskia River. Their claim was
on the Chisholm Trail.
The three young men found pioneer life hard and by the time the winter of 1872 rolled around, they were nearly destitute. Their cash had all been spent on stocking their claim with cattle.
Writing to relatives back home in Parksley, the men requested $350 to get them through the winter. There was an additional problem, however, when wrote M.S., "the postmaster...stole our draft, and we had a lean winter - prairie chickens, cornbread, and milk."
They persevered, however, and following the conviction of the postmaster and the return of their money, more cattle were purchased.
M.S. next related how in 1874 the grasshopper plague hit the plains. "One day we went out with corn knives to cut the corn," he wrote. "After working all morning, we had to ride two miles for dinner - and when we got back we could hardly find the sod corn. The grasshoppers had arrived during our absence, and they literally ate everything. - We had to put our clothes in the dugout to keep the grasshoppers from eating them. They were so thick they even stopped the Santa Fe train running to Dodge City."
More cattle dealing in the southwest followed. Again, adversity took its toll. Less than half of a herd of 1,050 survived one strenuous drive. In 1876, MS. and the two Ewells sold their remaining livestock and returned to Parksley.
It is not clear from the surviving notes exactly when M.S. Justis returned to the prairie life; however, it is clear that in 1878 he and Olive were reunited near Dodge City. Dr. A.F.D. Ewell apparently remained in Parksley, the town in which his gravesite can be seen today.
Indian uprisings were the norm at the time Ewell and Justis got back in the cattle business.
M.S. wrote, "While riding up the Chisholm Trail one day I saw a group of men coming. When I got closer to them I found they were Indians. I was so scared I had to hold my hat on with my hand."
Despite this additional peril, the partners were successful enough that in 1884 they became key investors in the Kiowa Town Company.
The stockholders purchased 5,000 acres of Kansas territory at $8 an acre. The town of Kiowa was born.
Being a businessman, M.S. knew the town needed a financial institution to draw in other enterprises. Soon the Bank of Kiowa was a reality - but not until after the safe, being brought in from great distance by wagon, had spent several days stuck in the Medicine River.
Not wanting to risk such difficulty with the delivery of the cash to stock the safe, M.S. rode from Harper to the fledging town with $8,000 operational money in his pants pocket.
The next major event in M.S. Justis' new town was one which, strangely enough, was occurring simultaneously in his native town. The first trims to pull into Kiowa, and Parksley, likely received the same jubilar receptions back in 1885.
Meanwhile the cattle business of Ewell and Justis was flourishing at last. Twenty-five thousand head of cattle grazed on prairie land lease from the Cherokees. There were still some rough times ahead o particularly after the "open range" was opened for settlement.
But until his death in 1938, M.S. Justis, retained his pioneer spirit ... an his ties to his native Eastern Shore. He boasted of having returned to Parksley 11 times during the years he was helping to settle a once wild land. But it was his own town of Kiowa he loved best ... and which love him best.
That obituary did contain a bit more than the basic facts about the man. It contained a tribute ... "His life was that of the rugged and progressive pioneer, always willing and eager to render his part to the best interest his community and surroundings." (Source Eastern Shore News, April 1984, by Candy Taylor) 
Ewell, Dr. Augustus D.F. (I40782)
 
130 "Plotting a path from Parksley to prairie" By Candy Taylor
Editor's note:
In 1984 a lady living in New Mexico placed an ad in the Eastern Shore News requesting information about her ancestors. T. Drummond Mason of Parksley responded to that ad. In return he received information about a Parksley native who played a key role in the settling of the west- but never forgot his roots. Mr. Mason has made that information available for publication in the following account of the life of one remarkable man.
The obituary appeared in the Nov. 7, 1938 edition of the Kiowa News - Review - Record in Kiowa, Kan. "Major Socrates Justis, son of Samuel and Mary Justis, was born on Dec. 25, 1848. near Parksley, Accomac (sic) County, Va.," it read. "He departed this life at his home in Kiowa, Kan., on Nov. 2, 1938, at the age of 89 years, ten months, and seven days."
No simple newspaper obituary could have contained what those 89-plus years had represented - or the mark M.S. Justis had left on one area along the old Chisholm Trail.
Apparently, M.S. had spent his early years living quite happily in the Parksley area, but at the age of 24 got a hankering to wander out west. It was 1872, and the west was still wild. Fortunately, M.S. had at some point recounted his fabulous experiences to a reporter in Kansas. Thus they have been preserved for posterity.
He began his account with details of how he, along with Dr. A.F.D. Ewell and Oliver Ewell, made their way from Parksley to the mighty Mississippi in just four days. After crossing the river on a ferry, the trio eventually, by way of a team and wagon, arrived in Summer County, Kan., where they staked a claim on the Chikaskia River. Their claim was
on the Chisholm Trail.
The three young men found pioneer life hard and by the time the winter of 1872 rolled around, they were nearly destitute. Their cash had all been spent on stocking their claim with cattle.
Writing to relatives back home in Parksley, the men requested $350 to get them through the winter. There was an additional problem, however, when wrote M.S., "the postmaster...stole our draft, and we had a lean winter - prairie chickens, cornbread, and milk."
They persevered, however, and following the conviction of the postmaster and the return of their money, more cattle were purchased.
M.S. next related how in 1874 the grasshopper plague hit the plains. "One day we went out with corn knives to cut the corn," he wrote. "After working all morning, we had to ride two miles for dinner - and when we got back we could hardly find the sod corn. The grasshoppers had arrived during our absence, and they literally ate everything. - We had to put our clothes in the dugout to keep the grasshoppers from eating them. They were so thick they even stopped the Santa Fe train running to Dodge City."
More cattle dealing in the southwest followed. Again, adversity took its toll. Less than half of a herd of 1,050 survived one strenuous drive. In 1876, MS. and the two Ewells sold their remaining livestock and returned to Parksley.
It is not clear from the surviving notes exactly when M.S. Justis returned to the prairie life; however, it is clear that in 1878 he and Olive were reunited near Dodge City. Dr. A.F.D. Ewell apparently remained in Parksley, the town in which his gravesite can be seen today.
Indian uprisings were the norm at the time Ewell and Justis got back in the cattle business.
M.S. wrote, "While riding up the Chisholm Trail one day I saw a group of men coming. When I got closer to them I found they were Indians. I was so scared I had to hold my hat on with my hand."
Despite this additional peril, the partners were successful enough that in 1884 they became key investors in the Kiowa Town Company.
The stockholders purchased 5,000 acres of Kansas territory at $8 an acre. The town of Kiowa was born.
Being a businessman, M.S. knew the town needed a financial institution to draw in other enterprises. Soon the Bank of Kiowa was a reality - but not until after the safe, being brought in from great distance by wagon, had spent several days stuck in the Medicine River.
Not wanting to risk such difficulty with the delivery of the cash to stock the safe, M.S. rode from Harper to the fledging town with $8,000 operational money in his pants pocket.
The next major event in M.S. Justis' new town was one which, strangely enough, was occurring simultaneously in his native town. The first trims to pull into Kiowa, and Parksley, likely received the same jubilar receptions back in 1885.
Meanwhile the cattle business of Ewell and Justis was flourishing at last. Twenty-five thousand head of cattle grazed on prairie land lease from the Cherokees. There were still some rough times ahead o particularly after the "open range" was opened for settlement.
But until his death in 1938, M.S. Justis, retained his pioneer spirit ... an his ties to his native Eastern Shore. He boasted of having returned to Parksley 11 times during the years he was helping to settle a once wild land. But it was his own town of Kiowa he loved best ... and which love him best.
That obituary did contain a bit more than the basic facts about the man. It contained a tribute ... "His life was that of the rugged and progressive pioneer, always willing and eager to render his part to the best interest his community and surroundings." (Source Eastern Shore News, April 1984, by Candy Taylor) 
Ewell, Oliver D.P. (I40783)
 
131 "Professor Russell Dead--Clinton H. Russell, an instructor in music at the Oregon Blind school in this city, died at the Salem Hospital on Sunday evening, March 8, 1903, at 7:30 o'clock, of heart disease. He had been sick for about one month, but two weeks ago was much better and was removed to the Salem Hospital. Sunday, however, he became much worse, and about noon was removed to the hospital again, where he sank rapidly until 7:30 o'clock, when the end came, bringing relief after a period of great suffering, which the sick man bore with great patience. Clinton Russell was born in Virginia, June 15, 1879, and at the age of five years became totally blind as a result of an injury received by falling from a sleigh and striking his head while coasting down a hill. He was educated at a school for the blind in Baltimore, Maryland, and for four years he held a position in the school as instructor in music. In September, 1901, he came to Salem and has since had charge of the musical department of the Blind School. He was an excellent teacher of several instruments, including the piano, cornet and trombone, but his specialty was the violin. He also taught piano tuning, having had years experience as a piano tuner in the Knabe Piano Factory. The mother and father of the deceased are both dead. He leaves two sisters, Florence and Leila, in Washington, D.C., and one brother, now doing service in the United States army in the Philippines. His abilities were of a high order and varied, his pupils making rapid progress. He was considered a very successful teacher and his place will be hard to fill. Rev. Geo. C. Ritchey conducted funeral services at the school chapel yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock and the remains were interred in Lee Mission cemetery." DOS 10 Mar 1903 3:1 (bio source: Oregon Pioneers Website) Russell, Prof. Clinton H. (I99661)
 
132 "Revolutionary Soldiers and Sailors of Accomack..." has him identified incorrectly as John White, of the Virginia State Navy, no children but three sisters: Elizabeth White who is dead leaving Robert White, Margaret Hall and the children of Betsey Ross; Mary Taylor who is dead leaving William C. Taylor; Susan Smith, dead, leaving John Smith Walker, Joseph (I6796)
 
133 "Rip" Engles was the football coach at Penn State University. Family: Charles 'Rip' Engles / Mary Weber Broughton (F1297)
 
134 "Rudder" 2/8/1767 Samuel Brittingham son of Elijah sold to Esme Marshall. 8/5/1772 Thomas Marshall sold 1 3/4A to Jacob Boston. 4/2/1771 Thomas Brittingham sold to Thomas Marshall 96A of "Brittingham's Chance" & "Rudder." 5/21/1777 Thomas Marshall sold to Esme and John Drummond Marshall 244A of "Little Convenience" and "Rudder." 8/4/1786 Thomas Marshall with wife Esther sold to Zadock Wheeler 5 1/8A. (Ruth T. Dryden, Worcester Land Records, p. 533) Marshall, Thomas (I3297)
 
135 "Rush Porter departed this life Oct the 23rd 1860 Aged 17 years and 11 months and 10 days." From leaved booklet with poetry and recorded deaths of Samuel J., Rush and Sally Porter found in possession of Hattie Marshall Scott, now held at the Nabb Center Salisbury University. Porter, Levin Rush (I124548)
 
136 "Sally" (Killmon) and her husband, James Trehern, were mentioned in the settlement papers for her brother, William's, estate in 1848. Killmon, Sarah 'Sally' (I16982)
 
137 "Teackle of Arglus", age 15 to 26; female same age Taylor, Teackle (I129206)
 
138 "The CommonWealth of Virginia to the sheriff of Accomack County Greeting we command you that you summon Jacob Taylor administrator of George Taylor decd to appear before the justices of our Court...at the Courthouse the day 4th June 1795 in the 19th Year of the CommonWealth" Taylor, Jacob (of Jos & Bridget) (I114862)
 
139 "The CommonWealth of Virginia to the sheriff of Accomack County Greeting we command you that you summon Jacob Taylor administrator of George Taylor decd to appear before the justices of our Court...at the Courthouse the day 4th June 1795 in the 19th Year of the CommonWealth" Taylor, George (of Jacob) (I88832)
 
140 "Thomas Hall & c. plantifs against Benjamin West defendant in chancery - continued." (Acc Co Orders, 1822-24, pages 19, 179, 365, 431 & 498 and Acc Co Orders, 1824-27, pages 203, 246, 299, 358, 417 & 518 and Acc Co Orders, 1829-32, pages 3 & 261). Finally on page 312 of the later reference, "Thomas Hall & c. plantifs vs. Benjamin West defendant in chancery - No person appearing to prosecute this suit, it is order that the same be dismissed, but without prejustice to the rights of the parties thereto." West, Benjamin (of Parker) (I6655)
 
141 "Thomas Piercen, 1 slave over 16 years old, 1 horse."
 
Pearson, Thomas (I43924)
 
142 "Though by birth a Friend, and scarcely in his teens, he became a volunteer in Col. David Hall's regiment in the early years of our Revolutionary struggle." (Anna Wharton Smith, Genealogy of the Fisher Family, 1896, Philadelphia, PA)

He was made Brigadier General of Sussex County during the War of 1812 and took part in the defenses of Lewes and present at the bombardment there. (Anna Wharton Smith, Genealogy of the Fisher Family, 1896, Philadelphia, PA) 
Fisher, Thomas (of Jabez M) (I126487)
 
143 "To son Labin Gunter all my lands, not disturbing my son Steven in the land he now holds during the life of the said Steven, son Labin to pay at the end of 5 years to my grandson Stephen Gunter, son of Levin, 5 £; 5 £ to my grandson Steven Gunter, son of Stephen at the end of 7 years; 5 £ to my grandson Purnal Lurton, son of Labin Lurton at the end of 7 years. 1/3 of the bal. of my est. to my dau. Mary Gunter, 1/3 to my dau. Rachel Gunter & the other 1/3 to be div. bet. my grandchildren Euphamy & Edward Gunter, children of Stephen Gunter. Friends Isaiah Bagwell & William Cord Exrs. Witt: Isaiah Bagwell, Thomas Scott, Major West"  Gunter, Laban (I25532)
 
144 "To the Worshipful Justices of Accomack County in Chancery - The Bill of complaint of John Cole Jnr humbly showeth unto your worships That a Certain Comfort Taylor late of this County departed this life intestate and w fine? covent? In the year 1817 leaving four children viz Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor - That the said Comfort Taylor at the time of her death was seized in her own right in fee simple of two tracts or parcels of Land situated in this county on the headwaters of Assawoman Creek...containing by estimation together Ninety seven and 3/4 acres, be the same more or less, subject to a life Estate in Staton Taylor as Tenant by the cortesy? That the said Staton Taylor departed this life in the year 1820. Your Orator is advised That on the death of the sd Comfort Taylor the elder the Tract of Land aforesaid descended in parcenacy to all her aforesaid children, subject to the ?? of the sd Staton Taylor aforesaid and on his death the aforesd was subject to partition amongst the aforesd children. Your Orator also shows unto your Worships that on the 21st day of March 1823 Crippen Taylor Joseph Conquest and George Warner Jnr by deed of record in the Court, conveyed to the said Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor a Tract of Land containing by estimation Seven acres adjoining...The said Comfort Taylor the younger departed thia life on the day of 1823 an infant and without issue..." Case continues for several more pages - Harriet and Sarah Ann, being infants, needed court approval for partition Taylor, Staton (of Shadrack) (I27028)
 
145 "To the Worshipful Justices of Accomack County in Chancery - The Bill of complaint of John Cole Jnr humbly showeth unto your worships That a Certain Comfort Taylor late of this County departed this life intestate and w fine? covent? In the year 1817 leaving four children viz Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor - That the said Comfort Taylor at the time of her death was seized in her own right in fee simple of two tracts or parcels of Land situated in this county on the headwaters of Assawoman Creek...containing by estimation together Ninety seven and 3/4 acres, be the same more or less, subject to a life Estate in Staton Taylor as Tenant by the cortesy? That the said Staton Taylor departed this life in the year 1820. Your Orator is advised That on the death of the sd Comfort Taylor the elder the Tract of Land aforesaid descended in parcenacy to all her aforesaid children, subject to the ?? of the sd Staton Taylor aforesaid and on his death the aforesd was subject to partition amongst the aforesd children. Your Orator also shows unto your Worships that on the 21st day of March 1823 Crippen Taylor Joseph Conquest and George Warner Jnr by deed of record in the Court, conveyed to the said Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor a Tract of Land containing by estimation Seven acres adjoining...The said Comfort Taylor the younger departed thia life on the day of 1823 an infant and without issue..." Case continues for several more pages - Harriet and Sarah Ann, being infants, needed court approval for partition Nock, Comfort (I70746)
 
146 "To the Worshipful Justices of Accomack County in Chancery - The Bill of complaint of John Cole Jnr humbly showeth unto your worships That a Certain Comfort Taylor late of this County departed this life intestate and w fine? covent? In the year 1817 leaving four children viz Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor - That the said Comfort Taylor at the time of her death was seized in her own right in fee simple of two tracts or parcels of Land situated in this county on the headwaters of Assawoman Creek...containing by estimation together Ninety seven and 3/4 acres, be the same more or less, subject to a life Estate in Staton Taylor as Tenant by the cortesy? That the said Staton Taylor departed this life in the year 1820. Your Orator is advised That on the death of the sd Comfort Taylor the elder the Tract of Land aforesaid descended in parcenacy to all her aforesaid children, subject to the ?? of the sd Staton Taylor aforesaid and on his death the aforesd was subject to partition amongst the aforesd children. Your Orator also shows unto your Worships that on the 21st day of March 1823 Crippen Taylor Joseph Conquest and George Warner Jnr by deed of record in the Court, conveyed to the said Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor a Tract of Land containing by estimation Seven acres adjoining...The said Comfort Taylor the younger departed thia life on the day of 1823 an infant and without issue..." Case continues for several more pages - Harriet and Sarah Ann, being infants, needed court approval for partition Taylor, Comfort (I129192)
 
147 "To the Worshipful Justices of Accomack County in Chancery - The Bill of complaint of John Cole Jnr humbly showeth unto your worships That a Certain Comfort Taylor late of this County departed this life intestate and w fine? covent? In the year 1817 leaving four children viz Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor - That the said Comfort Taylor at the time of her death was seized in her own right in fee simple of two tracts or parcels of Land situated in this county on the headwaters of Assawoman Creek...containing by estimation together Ninety seven and 3/4 acres, be the same more or less, subject to a life Estate in Staton Taylor as Tenant by the cortesy? That the said Staton Taylor departed this life in the year 1820. Your Orator is advised That on the death of the sd Comfort Taylor the elder the Tract of Land aforesaid descended in parcenacy to all her aforesaid children, subject to the ?? of the sd Staton Taylor aforesaid and on his death the aforesd was subject to partition amongst the aforesd children. Your Orator also shows unto your Worships that on the 21st day of March 1823 Crippen Taylor Joseph Conquest and George Warner Jnr by deed of record in the Court, conveyed to the said Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor a Tract of Land containing by estimation Seven acres adjoining...The said Comfort Taylor the younger departed thia life on the day of 1823 an infant and without issue..." Case continues for several more pages - Harriet and Sarah Ann, being infants, needed court approval for partition Taylor, Sarah Ann (I27029)
 
148 "To the Worshipful Justices of Accomack County in Chancery - The Bill of complaint of John Cole Jnr humbly showeth unto your worships That a Certain Comfort Taylor late of this County departed this life intestate and w fine? covent? In the year 1817 leaving four children viz Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor - That the said Comfort Taylor at the time of her death was seized in her own right in fee simple of two tracts or parcels of Land situated in this county on the headwaters of Assawoman Creek...containing by estimation together Ninety seven and 3/4 acres, be the same more or less, subject to a life Estate in Staton Taylor as Tenant by the cortesy? That the said Staton Taylor departed this life in the year 1820. Your Orator is advised That on the death of the sd Comfort Taylor the elder the Tract of Land aforesaid descended in parcenacy to all her aforesaid children, subject to the ?? of the sd Staton Taylor aforesaid and on his death the aforesd was subject to partition amongst the aforesd children. Your Orator also shows unto your Worships that on the 21st day of March 1823 Crippen Taylor Joseph Conquest and George Warner Jnr by deed of record in the Court, conveyed to the said Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor a Tract of Land containing by estimation Seven acres adjoining...The said Comfort Taylor the younger departed thia life on the day of 1823 an infant and without issue..." Case continues for several more pages - Harriet and Sarah Ann, being infants, needed court approval for partition Taylor, Edward (I27030)
 
149 "To the Worshipful Justices of Accomack County in Chancery - The Bill of complaint of John Cole Jnr humbly showeth unto your worships That a Certain Comfort Taylor late of this County departed this life intestate and w fine? covent? In the year 1817 leaving four children viz Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor - That the said Comfort Taylor at the time of her death was seized in her own right in fee simple of two tracts or parcels of Land situated in this county on the headwaters of Assawoman Creek...containing by estimation together Ninety seven and 3/4 acres, be the same more or less, subject to a life Estate in Staton Taylor as Tenant by the cortesy? That the said Staton Taylor departed this life in the year 1820. Your Orator is advised That on the death of the sd Comfort Taylor the elder the Tract of Land aforesaid descended in parcenacy to all her aforesaid children, subject to the ?? of the sd Staton Taylor aforesaid and on his death the aforesd was subject to partition amongst the aforesd children. Your Orator also shows unto your Worships that on the 21st day of March 1823 Crippen Taylor Joseph Conquest and George Warner Jnr by deed of record in the Court, conveyed to the said Edward, Harriet, Sarah Ann & Comfort Taylor a Tract of Land containing by estimation Seven acres adjoining...The said Comfort Taylor the younger departed thia life on the day of 1823 an infant and without issue..." Case continues for several more pages - Harriet and Sarah Ann, being infants, needed court approval for partition Taylor, Harriet (I27031)
 
150 "To the Worshipful Justices of Accomack County in Chancery. Humbly complaining show unto your Worships your Orator & oratrix Edmund Taylor and Harriet Taylor infants by Crippen Taylor their next friend, That a certain Staton Taylor late of this County departed this life intestate some time in the year 1821, leaving Six children, viz your orator and oratrix and Sarah Ann, Comfort, John & Mary Taylor...that all the aforesaid children of the said Staton Taylor are infants..." An itemization of money received by each child in the sale of their father's land on page 7 gives full names. Taylor, Staton (of Shadrack) (I27028)
 

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